Some people can lead, some can delegate. Few can do both.

Big Business
Good Delegator
Bill Gates. Sure. he's a visionary, but he's also a man who hires people who revel in the numbing intricacies of binary code and then stays out of their way -- and rewards their achievements. The idea that a successful corporation should enrich not only its executives and big shareholders but also its line employees was revolutionary. Gates has overseen the creation of great wealth, and is willing to share.

Bad Delegator
Steve Jobs. Jobs is almost certainly a greater visionary than Gates. He's a man who wants to change the world -- but God help the employee who doesn't execute his dream to exact specifications. It's been reported that Jobs's drive for perfection often leads him to remain ignorant to others' ideas. One former employee said that Jobs was so demanding that, on principle, he would often reject anyone's work the first time it was shown to him. To counter this, workers deliberately presented their weakest work first.

Big Business
Good Delegator
Mary Kay. The cosmetics queen mobilized a sales force and empowered them to take the company's business plan on the road, door to door. With success depending on those employees, she pioneered training programs and elaborate employee incentives that included awarding top performers with pink Cadillacs. But the most valuable gift Kay gave all her employees was a clearly stated philosophy and a template to carry it out.

Bad Delegator
Martha Stewart. Despite being someone who has overseen every last detail of the construction of her media empire, Stewart suddenly claimed she had no part in overseeing the sale of 4,000 shares of another firm's stock the day before its price plunged. Her contention: She delegated that responsibility to a 20-something broker's assistant, so he's the one to blame. No one can perform at their best when they can't trust the people who manage them. Anyone in a position to delegate has to be ready to back up their people.

Sports
Good Delegator
Joe Torre. As the Yankees' manager, he takes good people and lets them do what they do best -- perform. He allows his boss, George Steinbrenner, to take the spotlight for building the team, while he focuses on sustaining the team ethos. He empowers coaches to handle their respective areas and allows them to enjoy the media recognition for their contributions. But most importantly, he doesn't criticize his coaches or players publicly.

Bad Delegator
Michael Jordan. As one of the owners of the NBA's Washington Wizards, His Airness quickly got tired of watching his team lose while he sat in the front office. With little faith in his players to take the ball to the hoop themselves, Jordan came out of retirement to take over on the court. The result: a season of mixed results and a team future that is muddled today. Diving in and doing the job yourself is the worst thing a manager can do. It devastates the confidence of your staff and leaves them demoralized and demotivated.