by Matt Alderton | October 09, 2018
Every day, millions of people across the United States wake up and go to work. Although some of them love what they do, many of them hear their alarm clock go off and instinctively wish they could do something else with their day, instead. If you're lucky, there might be a time in your life when you get to do exactly that.

Indeed, many people at some point in life take a break from the workforce in order to pursue "passion projects" such as traveling, volunteering or raising a family. If you're one of them, the hardest part about taking a break from your career will probably be coming back to it when your break is over.

"Whether you took the summer off to travel, or a few years off to start the company of your dreams, pursuing your passion can inspire new ideas and personal growth. But how do you successfully re-enter the traditional workforce after your passion-fueled sabbatical?" asks Fast Company contributor Angie Williams.

The answer is easy: Don't hide the fact that you took a break; embrace it.

"Avoid downplaying the experience you had while away from the traditional workforce," Williams advises. "If you cannot professionally articulate what impact your time away from the office has had on your experience and skills, you won't be able to show your future employer why your passion project -- whether it was traveling, volunteering or starting your own business -- was a positive thing. Practice speaking about your experience in an inspiring and engaging way that makes it relevant to your career move."

Hopefully, your passion project was a learning experience. If so, articulate what you learned.

"Skills like time management, problem solving, communication or even a new language may be things you mastered during your time away from the office," Williams concludes. "Don't undercut these new abilities. Put them onto your resume with confidence."


More Tips:
https://www.fastcompany.com/90246100/this-is-exactly-how-to-position-your-passion-project-in-your-next-job-interview

Questions, Comments, Suggestions?
Contact Successful Meetings Editor in Chief Vincent Alonzo with your "How To" ideas.