by Matt Alderton | January 04, 2018
'Tis the season for making New Year's resolutions. If you're like most people, however, the changes you're trying to make today are doomed to fail tomorrow.
That's because big life changes don't happen overnight. "January is one of the worst times of year to do something new," Mike Vardy, author of "The Front Nine: How to Start the Year You Want Anytime You Want," tells Fast Company contributor Stephanie Vozza. "We've just lived through Thanksgiving, the shopping season, and Christmas. We have less than a week to decide what big things to manifest for next year. That's why the majority of the population doesn't stick with new habits."

Vozza says the key to making positive changes isn't New Year's resolutions; rather, it's "anti-resolutions" -- things you should stop doing.

"Resolutions are often born out of thoughts about what we should do, and rarely are they authentic desires," Vozza explains. "'What should I stop doing?' is a better question to ask yourself."

Anti-resolutions are effective because it's easier to stop old behaviors than it is to kickstart new ones.

"Instead of making a resolution to eat healthy, for example, start with, 'I will not eat fast food,'" Vozza says.

"It's more specific," Vardy adds. "And we all know what the end result will be."


More Tips:
https://www.fastcompany.com/40505463/why-you-should-make-an-anti-resolution-list-and-what-to-put-on-it

Questions, Comments, Suggestions?
Contact Successful Meetings Editor in Chief Vincent Alonzo with your "How To" ideas.